National Geographic (@natgeo)

National Geographic
@natgeo

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Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.

http://nationalgeographic.com/photography

Photos and Videos by @natgeo

Portrait by @andy_bardon /// After a morning spent visiting the 16th Street Baptist Church and Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham, Alabama, we made our way to the town of Selma and sat down with Annie Pearl (pictured), a foot soldier during the civil rights movement who was arrested during the famous march with Dr Martin Luther King across the Edmund Pettus bridge just blocks away. A fiery advocate for civil rights in the 21st century, she met us at the Selma Slavery and Civil War museum where she works tirelessly to inform people, especially in the African American community, to “know your history.” To her, this means tracing roots back to the great accomplishments of Egyptian dynasties as well as more recent black histories which instill a person with pride and ownership of culture. The road from Birmingham to Selma is not long. A hair under two hours due south utilizing state highways which cut through patches of humble Alabama forest. For our caravan of musicians, scholars and filmmakers though, our experiences in these two cities were quite different. Not a world apart, so much, as two parts of a deeply complicated world. Our crew has taken this trip through the wintry south to continue work on @omoiyari_songfilm, an innovative documentary which follows musician @kishi_bashi as he travels to sites of WW2 Japanese Incarceration in hopes of illuminating the largely unknown stories of these American concentration camps through musical exploration and reflection on his own identity as a person of Japanese descent living in the United States. A large part of Kishi Bashi’s vision for the Omoiyari film is to use art as a means to explore relevant social issues in the United States, today, and find commonalities across racial and class divides. With team @jtaylorsmith @maxreggieritter @andy_bardon @thenonoboyproject @takenobumusic /// Words by @thenonoboyproject

Portrait by @andy_bardon  /// After a morning spent visiting the 16th Street Baptist Church and Kelly Ingram Park in Birmingham, Alabama, we made our way to the town of Selma and sat down with Annie Pearl (pictured), a foot soldier during the civil rights movement who was arrested during the famous march with Dr Martin Luther King across the Edmund Pettus bridge just blocks away. A fiery advocate for civil rights in the 21st century, she met us at the Selma Slavery and Civil War museum where she works tirelessly to inform people, especially in the African American community, to “know your history.” To her, this means tracing roots back to the great accomplishments of Egyptian dynasties as well as more recent black histories which instill a person with pride and ownership of culture. The road from Birmingham to Selma is not long. A hair under two hours due south utilizing state highways which cut through patches of humble Alabama forest. For our caravan of musicians, scholars and filmmakers though, our experiences in these two cities were quite different. Not a world apart, so much, as two parts of a deeply complicated world. Our crew has taken this trip through the wintry south to continue work on @omoiyari_songfilm , an innovative documentary which follows musician @kishi_bashi  as he travels to sites of WW2 Japanese Incarceration in hopes of illuminating the largely unknown stories of these American concentration camps through musical exploration and reflection on his own identity as a person of Japanese descent living in the United States. A large part of Kishi Bashi’s vision for the Omoiyari film is to use art as a means to explore relevant social issues in the United States, today, and find commonalities across racial and class divides. With team @jtaylorsmith  @maxreggieritter  @andy_bardon  @thenonoboyproject  @takenobumusic  /// Words by @thenonoboyproject 

Photo by @ronan_donovan // Captured #withgalaxy S8, produced with @samsungmobileusa // A Rothschild’s giraffe flicks the flies away with its long wispy tail in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. Reaching nearly 20ft tall, giraffe evolved such a long necks in order to exploit the high tree leaves.

Photo by @ronan_donovan  // Captured #withgalaxy  S8, produced with @samsungmobileusa  // A Rothschild’s giraffe flicks the flies away with its long wispy tail in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. Reaching nearly 20ft tall, giraffe evolved such a long necks in order to exploit the high tree leaves.

Video by @joelsartore | This is Gigi, a two-week old snow monkey that is currently being hand-raised by her keepers at @blankparkzoo since her mother did not have the skills necessary to feed and raise her. When she’s old enough she will be reintegrated into her troop.
In the wild, these primates live in extremely cold conditions in Japan and can often be found warming up in the hot springs there. Snow monkeys are highly intelligent creatures. During a study in the 1950s, researchers observed a female snow monkey washing sand off of her sweet potato in river water as opposed to simply brushing the sand off like the other monkeys. She even discovered that dipping her potato in salt water added a bit of seasoning. When her siblings saw her washing and seasoning her food, they began to copy her actions. Soon, even her mother was washing her food in the river. Over the next few years, scientists discovered that this cleaning ritual had spread rapidly across the entire island, and within a decade every single monkey was washing their potatoes. Today, although none of the original monkeys are living, the monkeys on this island all still enjoy clean, seasoned potatoes.
To see a portrait of Gigi, follow @JoelSartore.

Video by @joelsartore  | This is Gigi, a two-week old snow monkey that is currently being hand-raised by her keepers at @blankparkzoo  since her mother did not have the skills necessary to feed and raise her. When she’s old enough she will be reintegrated into her troop. In the wild, these primates live in extremely cold conditions in Japan and can often be found warming up in the hot springs there. Snow monkeys are highly intelligent creatures. During a study in the 1950s, researchers observed a female snow monkey washing sand off of her sweet potato in river water as opposed to simply brushing the sand off like the other monkeys. She even discovered that dipping her potato in salt water added a bit of seasoning. When her siblings saw her washing and seasoning her food, they began to copy her actions. Soon, even her mother was washing her food in the river. Over the next few years, scientists discovered that this cleaning ritual had spread rapidly across the entire island, and within a decade every single monkey was washing their potatoes. Today, although none of the original monkeys are living, the monkeys on this island all still enjoy clean, seasoned potatoes. To see a portrait of Gigi, follow @JoelSartore. 

Photo @coryrichards Climbing is half dance, half force. Every year, the sport evolves beyond what is commonly held as ‘impossible’, begging the question of the minds role in sport. How much of what is accomplished physically is reflective of an individuals unique mental capacity, and why are some so much more adept and likely to break through ceilings once thought unbreakable? Canadian Rockies ice dwarfs an ice climber on Alberta Highway 93, also known as the Icefields Parkway.

Photo @coryrichards  Climbing is half dance, half force. Every year, the sport evolves beyond what is commonly held as ‘impossible’, begging the question of the minds role in sport. How much of what is accomplished physically is reflective of an individuals unique mental capacity, and why are some so much more adept and likely to break through ceilings once thought unbreakable? Canadian Rockies ice dwarfs an ice climber on Alberta Highway 93, also known as the Icefields Parkway.

Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - Mountain regions respond sensitively to climate change. Taking advantage of Alpine caves, a team of scientists led by Swiss Paleoclimatologist Dr. Marc Luetscher from the Swiss Institute for Speleology and Karst Studies (SISKA), is working to understand how permafrost has evolved through time. Ice caves form through a combination of snow intrusion and/or congelation of water infiltrating a karst system. Often up to several centuries old, the climate record of this ice remains largely under-studied. Today we are also able to tell if a cave was an ice cave in the past. This is achieved by looking for cryogenic cave calcites. These form when water enters a cave, and freezes and turns to ice. In this process, the water becomes progressively enriched in ions to the point that it becomes super-saturated and precipitates calcite. 
Pictured here is the iconic Snow Volcano Hall inside Schwarzmooskogel Eishöhle, Austria. The chamber filled with giant ice and snow cones is 100m (300ft) wide and over 50m (150ft) high is one of the largest ice filled chambers in Europe. Sadly, in recent years due to climate change, these beautiful ice formations have melted dramatically. @natgeocreative

Photo by @shonephoto  (Robbie Shone) - Mountain regions respond sensitively to climate change. Taking advantage of Alpine caves, a team of scientists led by Swiss Paleoclimatologist Dr. Marc Luetscher from the Swiss Institute for Speleology and Karst Studies (SISKA), is working to understand how permafrost has evolved through time. Ice caves form through a combination of snow intrusion and/or congelation of water infiltrating a karst system. Often up to several centuries old, the climate record of this ice remains largely under-studied. Today we are also able to tell if a cave was an ice cave in the past. This is achieved by looking for cryogenic cave calcites. These form when water enters a cave, and freezes and turns to ice. In this process, the water becomes progressively enriched in ions to the point that it becomes super-saturated and precipitates calcite. Pictured here is the iconic Snow Volcano Hall inside Schwarzmooskogel Eishöhle, Austria. The chamber filled with giant ice and snow cones is 100m (300ft) wide and over 50m (150ft) high is one of the largest ice filled chambers in Europe. Sadly, in recent years due to climate change, these beautiful ice formations have melted dramatically. @natgeocreative 

Photo by @CristinaMittermeier // This Southern Ground Hornbill was doing something super interesting.  I watched him as he walked across the wet savannah hoarding frogs in its beak.  Every few steps he would stop, put down the frogs, gobble up a bug and then he would pick his bundle of frogs back up.  After a while i figured out he was taking his leggy loot back to his nest where his mate was probably waiting with a couple of chicks.  Under the heavy rains of the African winter, he eventually disappeared into the forest. 
#Follow at @CristinaMittermeier for more images and stories from Africa and the world, 
#TurningtheTide with @sea_legacy @PaulNicklen @EPixNix @LNixPix

Photo by @CristinaMittermeier  // This Southern Ground Hornbill was doing something super interesting. I watched him as he walked across the wet savannah hoarding frogs in its beak. Every few steps he would stop, put down the frogs, gobble up a bug and then he would pick his bundle of frogs back up. After a while i figured out he was taking his leggy loot back to his nest where his mate was probably waiting with a couple of chicks. Under the heavy rains of the African winter, he eventually disappeared into the forest. #Follow  at @CristinaMittermeier  for more images and stories from Africa and the world, #TurningtheTide  with @sea_legacy  @PaulNicklen  @EPixNix  @LNixPix 

Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - New Years Day, Camps Bay, Cape Town, South Africa 2003 - from Living(+)Positive - documenting those living with HIV - South Africa introduced free antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) in the public sector in April 2004 after a lengthy battle between activists and former President Thabo Mbeki and Health Minister Dr Manto Tshabalala-Msimang, who questioned the link between HIV and AIDS, and ARVs' effectiveness. As of 2016 the estimated overall HIV prevalence rate in South Africa was approximately 12,7% of the total population. The total number of people living with HIV was therefore estimated at approximately 7,03 million in 2016. For adults aged 15–49 years, an estimated 18,0% of the population is currently HIV positive. To see more of my work and projects follow me here @natgeo and @chancellordavid #southafrica

Photo by David Chancellor @chancellordavid  - New Years Day, Camps Bay, Cape Town, South Africa 2003 - from Living(+)Positive - documenting those living with HIV - South Africa introduced free antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) in the public sector in April 2004 after a lengthy battle between activists and former President Thabo Mbeki and Health Minister Dr Manto Tshabalala-Msimang, who questioned the link between HIV and AIDS, and ARVs' effectiveness. As of 2016 the estimated overall HIV prevalence rate in South Africa was approximately 12,7% of the total population. The total number of people living with HIV was therefore estimated at approximately 7,03 million in 2016. For adults aged 15–49 years, an estimated 18,0% of the population is currently HIV positive. To see more of my work and projects follow me here @natgeo  and @chancellordavid  #southafrica 

North Korea photo by @dguttenfelder 
A North Korean traffic police officer stands at an intersection post in the city of Kaesong near the demarcation line with South Korea. 
For more photography and video from inside North Korea, follow updated Instagram story highlites @dguttenfelder.

North Korea photo by @dguttenfelder  A North Korean traffic police officer stands at an intersection post in the city of Kaesong near the demarcation line with South Korea. For more photography and video from inside North Korea, follow updated Instagram story highlites @dguttenfelder. 

Video by @michaelchristopherbrown. 
Pigeons seem to be everywhere here in Waikiki, there are often so many that some restaurants surround their outdoor seating with nets to keep the birds out! I love shooting slow motion, a pace out of the visual experience for an enhanced awareness and understanding of the mechanics and subject of a scene.

Video by @michaelchristopherbrown.  Pigeons seem to be everywhere here in Waikiki, there are often so many that some restaurants surround their outdoor seating with nets to keep the birds out! I love shooting slow motion, a pace out of the visual experience for an enhanced awareness and understanding of the mechanics and subject of a scene.

Photo by @mishkusk (Michaela Skovranova)

The Crown of thorns starfish is native to coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific region. It's a marine invertebrate that feeds on coral.
On healthy coral reefs,  Crown of thorns plays an important role, as it tends to feed on the fastest growing corals allowing slower growing coral species to form colonies however in recent years populations have reached plague proportions and have devastated large areas of live coral in a very short period. Each night the nocturnal starfish can eat its own body area in coral. Combined with the challenges of climate change, the Crown of Thorns poses another significant threat to our reef systems. #coralreef #australia #greatbarrierreef #underwater #ocean #crownofthorns

Photo by @mishkusk  (Michaela Skovranova) The Crown of thorns starfish is native to coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific region. It's a marine invertebrate that feeds on coral. On healthy coral reefs,  Crown of thorns plays an important role, as it tends to feed on the fastest growing corals allowing slower growing coral species to form colonies however in recent years populations have reached plague proportions and have devastated large areas of live coral in a very short period. Each night the nocturnal starfish can eat its own body area in coral. Combined with the challenges of climate change, the Crown of Thorns poses another significant threat to our reef systems. #coralreef  #australia  #greatbarrierreef  #underwater  #ocean  #crownofthorns 

Video by @renan_ozturk

Painting – alpine style.

Many artists will labor over a certain painting for months or years. I’ve always just immersed myself completely in a specific environment and moment in time and let things flow. After a mad 24 hour push at 13,000 feet I finished a large landscape of the mountains that surround one of my favorite places on the planet – Khumjung, Nepal. At one point the dew washed away hours worth of watercolors, blending it all into strange patterns - forcing
me to start over on a soaked canvas, fixing some spots and leaving others. Over the course of the night, spotted by stars and clouds, I was accompanied by old friends - Ama Dablam and Tawoche, Kongde and Khumbila. Collaborative art, indeed. 
With @jetbutterflies @climber.abiral @dzifoundation See @renan_ozturk for more. #Nepal #nepaliloveyou #khumbu

Video by @renan_ozturk  Painting – alpine style. Many artists will labor over a certain painting for months or years. I’ve always just immersed myself completely in a specific environment and moment in time and let things flow. After a mad 24 hour push at 13,000 feet I finished a large landscape of the mountains that surround one of my favorite places on the planet – Khumjung, Nepal. At one point the dew washed away hours worth of watercolors, blending it all into strange patterns - forcing me to start over on a soaked canvas, fixing some spots and leaving others. Over the course of the night, spotted by stars and clouds, I was accompanied by old friends - Ama Dablam and Tawoche, Kongde and Khumbila. Collaborative art, indeed. With @jetbutterflies  @climber.abiral  @dzifoundation  See @renan_ozturk  for more. #Nepal  #nepaliloveyou  #khumbu 

Photo by @williamalbertallard // Brazil, 1988

Her name is Bernice and she had hair the color of farm butter. Only 12 and she has been stricken with malaria 15 times in the year. She and her family had been living in the Brazilian rainforest frontier of Rondonia, trying to make a living off a small farm. You could see the sickness in her eyes that were not green, not hazel, but a rare mixture of both. I made many portraits of her before I noticed the marks on the palm of her hand, written in blue. Notes for a test she was supposed to take at school but she couldn’t go because of the malaria attack. I wonder now if her family is still there?

#followme @williamalbertallard for more images from Brazil and other assignments spanning five decades. 
#brazil #brazilian #child #girl #portraitphotography #filmphotography

Photo by @williamalbertallard  // Brazil, 1988 Her name is Bernice and she had hair the color of farm butter. Only 12 and she has been stricken with malaria 15 times in the year. She and her family had been living in the Brazilian rainforest frontier of Rondonia, trying to make a living off a small farm. You could see the sickness in her eyes that were not green, not hazel, but a rare mixture of both. I made many portraits of her before I noticed the marks on the palm of her hand, written in blue. Notes for a test she was supposed to take at school but she couldn’t go because of the malaria attack. I wonder now if her family is still there? #followme  @williamalbertallard  for more images from Brazil and other assignments spanning five decades. #brazil  #brazilian  #child  #girl  #portraitphotography  #filmphotography 

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